Small white butterfly egg | Jo Angell Design
Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of an egg of the small white butterfly (Pieris rapae). Eggs are laid singly on the underside of leaves of Brassica plants (cabbage, broccoli) and nasturtiums. The sculpted shell is made of a protein called chorionin and has central aeropyles, breathing pores (brown), that allow air to flow to the developing embryo. Magnification: x160 when printed at 10 centimetres tall.

Small white butterfly egg | Jo Angell Design

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of an egg of the small white butterfly (Pieris rapae). Eggs are laid singly on the underside of leaves of Brassica plants (cabbage, broccoli) and nasturtiums. The sculpted shell is made of a protein called chorionin and has central aeropyles, breathing pores (brown), that allow air to flow to the developing embryo. Magnification: x160 when printed at 10 centimetres tall.

Tardigrade | jakattack555
Tardigrades (also known as waterbears or moss piglets) are water-dwelling, segmented micro-animals, with eight legs.
Tardigrades are classified as extremophiles, organisms that can thrive in a physically or geochemically extreme condition that would be detrimental to most life on Earth. For example, tardigrades can withstand temperatures from just above absolute zero to well above the boiling point of water, pressures about six times greater than those found in the deepest ocean trenches, ionizing radiation at doses hundreds of times higher than the lethal dose for a human, and the vacuum of outer space. They can go without food or water for more than 10 years, drying out to the point where they are 3% or less water, only to rehydrate, forage, and reproduce.
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Tardigrade | jakattack555

Tardigrades (also known as waterbears or moss piglets) are water-dwelling, segmented micro-animals, with eight legs.

Tardigrades are classified as extremophilesorganisms that can thrive in a physically or geochemically extreme condition that would be detrimental to most life on Earth. For example, tardigrades can withstand temperatures from just above absolute zero to well above the boiling point of water, pressures about six times greater than those found in the deepest ocean trenches, ionizing radiation at doses hundreds of times higher than the lethal dose for a human, and the vacuum of outer space. They can go without food or water for more than 10 years, drying out to the point where they are 3% or less water, only to rehydrate, forage, and reproduce.

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heythereuniverse:

Bring home the Universe!

Introducing the new and official Hey there, Universe online store! (powered by Amazon)

I have went through the entirety of the science-“cosm” on Amazon and have hand-picked a select few items that are featured here. Most notably, I want to introduce my followers to a list of my favorite science books, most of which are considered “popular science”, but some are also good reads for beginners, as well as experts who are interested in topics from other subjects.

Along with the books—which have been categorized into “Astrobiology, Biology, Astronomy, Physics, Geology”—I have also picked out some of my favorite apparel items on Amazon as well as gifts, toys, decors, for all of us who want to bring home the universe. 

I will try to promote this shop as little as possible (potentially 2 or 3 times a week), not every other hour, so don’t fret! The shop is run by me but all the transactions will be handled through Amazon. Feel free to give me a feedback on the store, or if you’re interested in seeing any specific item in the list. 

Lastly, if you are a college student (it’s back-to-school time again!), I would definitely recommend getting Amazon Prime! I’m sure you’ve heard of it by now, you get FREE Two-Day Shipping for one year just for signing up for Amazon Student. Click here to sign up today!

Three-dimensional map of a rotavirus | ZEISS Microscopy
This image shows a three-dimensional reconstruction of a rotavirus at a magnification of about 50,000. Rotavirus infects humans as well as other animals and causes severe diarrhea in infants and young children. There are very few fatalities in the United States and other places where a vaccine is available, but elsewhere, the virus is responsible for more than 450,000 deaths each year. Image courtesy of the National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California. 

Three-dimensional map of a rotavirus | ZEISS Microscopy

This image shows a three-dimensional reconstruction of a rotavirus at a magnification of about 50,000. Rotavirus infects humans as well as other animals and causes severe diarrhea in infants and young children. There are very few fatalities in the United States and other places where a vaccine is available, but elsewhere, the virus is responsible for more than 450,000 deaths each year. Image courtesy of the National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California. 

Lago volcánico - Kelimutu (Flores, Indonesia) | Banco de Imágenes Geológicas

The volcano contains three striking summit crater lakes of varying colors. Tiwu Ata Bupu (Lake of Old People) is usually blue and is the westernmost of the three lakes. The other two lakes, Tiwu Ko’o Fai Nuwa Muri (Lake of Young Men and Maidens) and Tiwu Ata Polo (Bewitched or Enchanted Lake) are separated by a shared crater wall and are typically green or red respectively. The lake colors vary on a periodic basis. Subaqueous fumaroles are the probable cause of active upwelling that occurs at the two eastern lakes.

The lakes have been a source of minor phreatic eruptions in historical time. The summit of the compound 1639-m-high Kelimutu volcano is elongated two km in a WNW-ESE direction; the older cones of Kelido and Kelibara are located respectively three km to the north and two km to the south. The scenic lakes are a popular tourist destination.

Kelimutu is also of interest to geologists because the three lakes have different colors yet are at the crest of the same volcano.According to the local officer at Kelimutu National Park, the colour changes as a result of chemical reactions resulting from the minerals contained in the lake perhaps triggered by volcano gas activity.Kawah Putih lake in West Java, south of Bandung, is another crater lake in Indonesia with some similarities to the lakes at Kelimutu.

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Anonymous asked:

when you're conducting research, how do you do it?

That depends on what kind of research you’re talking about. When I was working in a microbiology lab, there was a lot of molecular genetics, and culturing involved. Most of the “conducting research” comes from collecting data on bacterial growth, responses to various factors that could affect it—barring that it’s reproducible in a laboratory conditions of course—such as temperature, pH, salinity, etc. Per molecular genetics, it’s more DNA based. So I would perform various DNA extractions, run it through a PCR and then gel the thing in order to see what’s going on with the sequences. You can pick and choose where and what segments of DNA by using bioinformatics—which basically involves reading the sequence from a database, creating a primer, etc and then letting it run with an enzyme to produce DNA segments that you can observe via electrophoresis. I also did multiplex PCR, looked at epidemic clones (bacterial strains that are specific to outbreaks), and typical growth profiles.

In organic geochemistry—which is what I do now in grad school—different laboratory discipline is involved. In order to analyze organic molecules, you have to extract them first. Mostly from liquid or solid samples. Since I’m working on a cryogenic brine system, where you can find extremophile bacterial system sustaining energy without sunlight and what not, I have to work in with a more rigorous rule of preventing contamination. Antarctic lakes are really hard to access so I only have limited amount of samples. Which means that conducting research is significantly harder. Extraction is exceptionally tedious, especially with a ton of different organic solvents. Once I extract organics, I basically dissolve it in a medium that’s detectable with a GC-MS—which is an instrument used to detect compounds on a molecule-by-molecule level. We send GC-MS to Mars for a reason because it’s the best instrument out there that can detect molecules and tell us what it is. Right now, I’m trying to “characterize” a slew of organic compounds, rather than looking at some sort of “change” like I did in microbiology. 

Essentially, the research I’m conducting now is like a “shotgun” approach, whereas before, it was definitely very standard-based and “methodological”

Hope this answered your question!

terrasociety:

Dreadnoughtus: Gigantic, exceptionally complete sauropod dinosaur | ScienceDaily

Scientists have discovered and described a new supermassive dinosaur species with the most complete skeleton ever found of its type. At 85 feet (26 m) long and weighing about 65 tons (59,300 kg) in life, Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which a body mass can be accurately calculated. Its skeleton is exceptionally complete, with over 70 percent of the bones, excluding the head, represented. Because all previously discovered supermassive dinosaurs are known only from relatively fragmentary remains, Dreadnoughtus offers an unprecedented window into the anatomy and biomechanics of the largest animals to ever walk the Earth.

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