Alzheimer’s disease culture cells | Duck Bunny Theatre
Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of cells used in Alzheimer’s disease research. These cells have been genetically engineered to produce amyloid precursor protein (APP), which in turn forms the protein amyloid. Plaques of amyloid in the brain are a major pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease. These cells are cultured from a nerve cancer (neuroblastoma), and have shorter and more numerous processes (dendrites and axons) than healthy nerve cells. Alzheimer’s is a brain- wasting disease common in the elderly. It causes confusion, memory loss, personality changes and eventually death. 

Alzheimer’s disease culture cells | Duck Bunny Theatre

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of cells used in Alzheimer’s disease research. These cells have been genetically engineered to produce amyloid precursor protein (APP), which in turn forms the protein amyloid. Plaques of amyloid in the brain are a major pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease. These cells are cultured from a nerve cancer (neuroblastoma), and have shorter and more numerous processes (dendrites and axons) than healthy nerve cells. Alzheimer’s is a brain- wasting disease common in the elderly. It causes confusion, memory loss, personality changes and eventually death. 

Widemouth Bay, Cornwall | Macc Lad
The original, essentially unmoved, bedrock of central Devon north of the Meldon area, is dominated by the Crackington Formation, a thick sequence of interbedded sandstones and dark grey shales, of late Lower to Upper Carboniferous age. The Crackington Formation represents a classic ‘flysch’ sequence with the sandstones formed from sands which flowed into the deep Culm basin after being dislodged from its slopes by earthquakes associated with the rise of the ‘Variscan Mountains’ to the south, during the early stages of the orogeny. These ‘turbidity currents’ deposited their load as their velocity dropped on reaching the gentler slopes towards the bottom of the basin. The weight of these sands pressing down into the soft muds, which had settled quietly onto the sea-bed between flows, often created well developed lobe-shaped ‘lode casts’. These structures are crucial ‘way-up’ indicators in the subsequently tightly folded Crackington Formation sequence. 
[Read more]

Widemouth Bay, Cornwall | Macc Lad

The original, essentially unmoved, bedrock of central Devon north of the Meldon area, is dominated by the Crackington Formation, a thick sequence of interbedded sandstones and dark grey shales, of late Lower to Upper Carboniferous age. The Crackington Formation represents a classic ‘flysch’ sequence with the sandstones formed from sands which flowed into the deep Culm basin after being dislodged from its slopes by earthquakes associated with the rise of the ‘Variscan Mountains’ to the south, during the early stages of the orogeny. These ‘turbidity currents’ deposited their load as their velocity dropped on reaching the gentler slopes towards the bottom of the basin. The weight of these sands pressing down into the soft muds, which had settled quietly onto the sea-bed between flows, often created well developed lobe-shaped ‘lode casts’. These structures are crucial ‘way-up’ indicators in the subsequently tightly folded Crackington Formation sequence. 

[Read more]

This Week’s Book Recommendation | Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space by Carl Sagan

Amazon’s Review: In Cosmos, the late astronomer Carl Sagan cast his gaze over the magnificent mystery of the Universe and made it accessible to millions of people around the world. Now in this stunning sequel, Carl Sagan completes his revolutionary journey through space and time.

Future generations will look back on our epoch as the time when the human race finally broke into a radically new frontier—space. In Pale Blue Dot Sagan traces the spellbinding history of our launch into the cosmos and assesses the future that looms before us as we move out into our own solar system and on to distant galaxies beyond. The exploration and eventual settlement of other worlds is neither a fantasy nor luxury, insists Sagan, but rather a necessary condition for the survival of the human race.

My Review: “I don’t think there will ever come a time that I will not recommend one of Carl Sagan’s books. As you all know, Carl has an incredibly unique ability to capture our endearing and innate curiosity about the universe, allowing us to experience the world with a humble mindset and a thirst for knowledge. The famous Pale Blue Dot photo was first described in this book by Carl who envisioned our future in space and reminded us of where we are, and where we came from. This book was the very reason that I decided to minor in Astronomy and have taken up the subject as a huge part of my scientific career. I can never ever thank Carl enough for that. ”

Only $10.59 on Amazon!

[Join Amazon Prime now as an Amazon Student (all you need is a .edu email) and get one year of FREE 2-day shipping!]

Enjoy!

heythereuniverse:

Bring home the Universe!

Introducing the new and official Hey there, Universe online store! (powered by Amazon)

I have went through the entirety of the science-“cosm” on Amazon and have hand-picked a select few items that are featured here. Most notably, I want to introduce my followers to a list of my favorite science books, most of which are considered “popular science”, but some are also good reads for beginners, as well as experts who are interested in topics from other subjects.

Along with the books—which have been categorized into “Astrobiology, Biology, Astronomy, Physics, Geology”—I have also picked out some of my favorite apparel items on Amazon as well as gifts, toys, decors, for all of us who want to bring home the universe. 

I will try to promote this shop as little as possible (potentially 2 or 3 times a week), not every other hour, so don’t fret! The shop is run by me but all the transactions will be handled through Amazon. Feel free to give me a feedback on the store, or if you’re interested in seeing any specific item in the list. 

Lastly, if you are a college student (it’s back-to-school time again!), I would definitely recommend getting Amazon Prime! I’m sure you’ve heard of it by now, you get FREE Two-Day Shipping for one year just for signing up for Amazon Student. Click here to sign up today!

Dark was the Night // Blind Willie Johnson

I came across this song on Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey, where Neil deGrasse Tyson first introduced The Golden Record—which is a symbolic message-in-a-bottle sent out into interstellar space on Voyager I intended for any extraterrestrial life forms who may find it. The Golden Record contains various sounds and images that were selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth.

This is my very first time hearing this full song, and nothing—so far, nothing, no sorts of music that I’ve ever heard of— had ever touched me in this way. I’m sitting here right now chest swelling and almost in tears. This is probably the most beautiful song that I’ve ever heard.

And to think that it’s on its way into the universe with the possibility that someone else maybe somewhere out there may find it— that was the most comforting thought. Because it felt like such a profound representation of mankind. Because it felt really human. 

scienceing:

scinote:

Coming soon: SciNote.org, launched by entrop-e, shychemist, and geogallery, is Tumblr’s project for promoting science education around the world.

At SciNote, we believe that science shouldn’t just be reading about the ideas of people with PhDs and Nobel Prizes. We believe that science is an active process of asking questions and finding answers.
That’s why we, at SciNote, want to hear from you. We want to ponder the interesting questions you pose and get excited with you over the cool science you see in your world.
SciNote will feature the best of the Tumblr science community, and we will compile and publish the top posts from every year in the form of a magazine available both digitally and in print. Think of SciNote magazine as the Tumblr science magazine.
We hope to celebrate our launch by featuring some of the coolest science from around Tumblr. So before we launch SciNote, we would like to collect 25 science posts and/or questions from you, including:
the most interesting science news you have come across
questions you’ve always wanted to ask
fascinating facts that you’ve learned
pictures of nature and/or science that you’ve taken
cool research that you’ve participated in
any other science-related thing you’d like to tell us!

So please:
Submit posts or ask questions to be featured on our blog and for an opportunity to be published in SciNote magazine.
Follow our blog at SciNote.org.
Read more about our project here.
If you’re interested, apply to join our staff here.
Reblog this post so that we can collect 25 posts and launch our project as soon as possible!
Thank you all and happy science!

This looks really awesome. Tumblr science community making science more accessible to the public! You go, friends. You go.

Hello SciNote! Welcome to the Tumblr science community! <3

scienceing:

scinote:

Coming soon: SciNote.org, launched by entrop-e, shychemist, and geogallery, is Tumblr’s project for promoting science education around the world.

At SciNote, we believe that science shouldn’t just be reading about the ideas of people with PhDs and Nobel Prizes. We believe that science is an active process of asking questions and finding answers.

That’s why we, at SciNote, want to hear from you. We want to ponder the interesting questions you pose and get excited with you over the cool science you see in your world.

SciNote will feature the best of the Tumblr science community, and we will compile and publish the top posts from every year in the form of a magazine available both digitally and in print. Think of SciNote magazine as the Tumblr science magazine.

We hope to celebrate our launch by featuring some of the coolest science from around Tumblr. So before we launch SciNote, we would like to collect 25 science posts and/or questions from you, including:

  • the most interesting science news you have come across
  • questions you’ve always wanted to ask
  • fascinating facts that you’ve learned
  • pictures of nature and/or science that you’ve taken
  • cool research that you’ve participated in
  • any other science-related thing you’d like to tell us!

So please:

  1. Submit posts or ask questions to be featured on our blog and for an opportunity to be published in SciNote magazine.
  2. Follow our blog at SciNote.org.
  3. Read more about our project here.
  4. If you’re interested, apply to join our staff here.
  5. Reblog this post so that we can collect 25 posts and launch our project as soon as possible!

Thank you all and happy science!

This looks really awesome. Tumblr science community making science more accessible to the public! You go, friends. You go.

Hello SciNote! Welcome to the Tumblr science community! <3

This Week’s Book Recommendation | Letters to a Young Scientist by E.O.Wilson

Amazon’s Review: Edward O. Wilson has distilled sixty years of teaching into a book for students, young and old. Reflecting on his coming-of-age in the South as a Boy Scout and a lover of ants and butterflies, Wilson threads these twenty-one letters, each richly illustrated, with autobiographical anecdotes that illuminate his career—both his successes and his failures—and his motivations for becoming a biologist. At a time in human history when our survival is more than ever linked to our understanding of science, Wilson insists that success in the sciences does not depend on mathematical skill, but rather a passion for finding a problem and solving it. From the collapse of stars to the exploration of rain forests and the oceans’ depths, Wilson instills a love of the innate creativity of science and a respect for the human being’s modest place in the planet’s ecosystem in his readers. 21 illustrations”

My Review: “E.O.Wilson captures a scientist’s imagination in the most wondrous ways—reminding us, young or old, how we first fell in love with nature and the world around us. Whether it’s the universe, or our ecosystems, we are biologically driven to feel interconnected with all there is—and what better way to explore that than via the means of science?”

Only $11.68 on Amazon!

[Join Amazon Prime now as an Amazon Student (all you need is a .edu email) and get one year of FREE 2-day shipping!]

Enjoy!